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Fireworks over USS Midway Museum

3 museums to keep on the horizon for 2021

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posted September 29, 2020
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If there’s one thing we know to be true during uncertain times, it’s this: Absence makes the heart grow fonder.

The absence of travel has made NTA members discover a deeper appreciation of what they already loved, whether it’s operators leading groups to incredible places, or destinations and attractions receiving those wild-eyed adventurers.

Patrons have been absent from museums for many weeks following closures due to COVID-19. But as these attractions move to reopen, they’re prioritizing visitor safety by implementing health protocols while curating new and exciting exhibits and modifying their programming.

The following museums are moving forward—their eyes set on a post-COVID world—and we’re pretty fond of what they have to offer.


National Museum of African American Music - Fifth & Broadway rendering (NMAAM)
Fifth & Broadway rendering of National Museum of African American Music (Photo by NMAAM)

National Museum of African American Music

With facility construction and exhibit fabrications winding down at the National Museum of African American Music in Nashville, the new venue will open its doors for the first time this fall. The attraction has been in development for more than 20 years.

Click here to see the full article.


"Road to Tokyo" exhibit at National WWII Museum
"Road to Tokyo" exhibit (Photo by National World War II Museum)

National World War II Museum

Stretching across six acres of New Orleans’ unique downtown landscape, the National World War II Museum is a trove of six pavilions with more than 250,000 artifacts and 9,000 personal accounts from veterans that piece together the war that changed the world.

Click here to see the full article.


Sunrise over the deck of the USS Midway
Sunrise over the deck of the USS Midway (Photo by USS Midway Museum)

USS Midway

The USS Midway may have opened as a museum in a San Diego harbor in 2004, but its story begins in a much earlier period—back to 1945 when it made history as the first in a three-ship class of large carriers with an armored flight deck that could hold 120 planes.

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Top photo by USS Midway

 


Support for Courier articles provided by:
Colonial Williamsburg Foundation
Graceland & Guest House at Graceland
History Colorado
Ronald Reagan Presidential Library and Museum